Connect with us

U.S.

Inner Cities In America Are A Mess – Here’s Why

Published

on

(Via Zerohedge)

The stories coming out from Chicago and Baltimore paint an increasingly pessimistic picture: that America’s inner cities are transitioning into a warzone, where violence has returned to levels not seen since the drug wars of the early 1990s.

Take for example Chicago, five men were killed and at least 20 people shot over the four-day Christmas holiday weekend. Last year, 59 people were shot over the same period, leaving 11 dead.

Across the United States, homicides rose about 9% last year with more than one-third of the increase concentrated in Chicago neighborhoods, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Despite the overall deterioration of American inner cities, there was some improvement in areas such as Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., where declines in violent crimes have been in downward trajectories since the 1990s.

According to the WSJ, soaring homicides in Chicago and Baltimore share wide wealth inequality rates, de-industrialization, depleted residential real estate, and a reduction of police officers following the Ferguson effect in 2014. Nevertheless, the opioid crisis is fueling much of this death and despair in the inner cities, trapping the younger generations into a perpetual world of crime.

Meanwhile, in Washington and Los Angeles, “gang interventions and community policing,” which explores ways to strengthen the community have led to a long-term reduction in homicides. The article brings up the dreaded word gentrification, while it has worked in Washington to suppress crime, it has certainly not been effective in Chicago and or Baltimore.

David Weisburd, a criminologist at George Mason University said about 1% of city streets contributes to 25% of a city’s crime, and 5% of the streets produces half the crime. He coined the phrase the “law of crime concentration.”

In Chicago, half the violent crime came from five neighborhoods, including West Garfield Park, exemplifying Weisburd’s theory. In fact, crime in the area has surged to levels not seen since the “drug wars fueled by the crack-cocaine epidemic” of the 1990s.

As the WSJ adds, “violence in Chicago erupted last year, with the city recording 771 murders—a 58% jump from 2015. The third largest city in the U.S. with 2.7 million people, Chicago had more murders than New York and Los Angeles combined.” Violent crime in Chicago is concentrated in just a handful of neighborhoods, where inequalities are wide and it’s not just in wealth.

WSJ interviewed Amarley Coggins who started dealing drugs aged 12. A decade later, he sits in jail for “felony drug charges and possession of a weapon”.

Amarley Coggins remembers the first time he dealt heroin, discreetly approaching a car coming off an interstate highway and into West Garfield Park, the neighborhood where he grew up on Chicago’s west side. He was 12 years old and had just been recruited into a gang by his older brothers and cousin.

A decade later, he sits in Cook County jail, held without bail and awaiting trial on three cases, including felony drug charges and possession of a weapon. “I have a lot of friends who didn’t make it to 22,” said Mr. Coggins, who hasn’t entered a plea. “I want to stay alive for my son and my family.”

“Baltimore City has a lot of people walking around that have committed homicides and shootings,” said former deputy police commissioner, Tony Barksdale. Meanwhile community leaders and former police members warn that police have disbanded proactive operations to combat crime since the April 2015 riots:

Some community leaders and former police officials say police have pulled back from a more proactive approach on the street since April 2015, when riots erupted after Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man, died from a broken neck he sustained in a police van. Officers had chased Mr. Gray from North and Pennsylvania, a known drug corner, and arrested him for allegedly possessing an illegal knife.

A police department spokesman said foot patrols have increased because now officers are mandated to walk through neighborhoods in the first months of field training, which wasn’t the case a few years ago.

Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin Davis, in charge since July 2015, also said violent criminals feel emboldened. He said judges too often give offenders who use guns suspended prison sentences.

“You look at Baltimore’s crime numbers, that’s criminals taking advantage of weakness,” Mr. Barksdale said. He further said: “I am against mass arrests, but you still need arrests.”

JPMorgan Chase funds the Racial Wealth Divide Initiative at CFED, and warns an astronomical amount of Baltimore citizens have a net worth of zero; the racial divide and wealth inequality is among the highest in the country, contributing to high levels of violent crime.

Baltimore residents describe life on the streets:

Ericka Alston-Buck, who runs a youth center blocks from where Mr. Gray was arrested in 2015, says the violence is tied to poverty that hasn’t eased since the riots. “You have to be here to feel the blight, the vacant houses, the cat-sized rodents that run through the streets, the open-air drug markets, prostitution, no grocery store,” she said.

Jacqueline Caldwell, a local resident who leads a nonprofit umbrella group that includes several west-side community associations, said the police have become nonexistent over the past two years. “I don’t think it takes a rocket scientist to figure out we need more police on the street, more community involvement with the police,” Ms. Caldwell said.

John Skinner, a former deputy police commissioner who retired in 2014, said after the riots, police feared “another triggering effect.” He said while he thinks the retreat from proactive policing was brief, its effects were lasting. “Violence can escalate really, really rapidly. When it occurs it’s tough to get that stabilization back,” he said.


The sad conclusion is that the inner-city playgrounds of the establishment elite, Chicago and Baltimore, have been let to fail. The decades-long experiment is now resulting in a war zone that is progressively getting worse, not better, despite recurring narratives to suck in poor millennials for revival purposes. As a country, it’s time to take two steps back and reflect on the failures before we taking any more steps “forward” otherwise the situation will only get worse.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Opinion

Dark Side of Surrogacy: A Modern Form of Human Trafficking

Published

on

In today’s capitalist society, the practice of surrogacy for gay couples has become increasingly normalized, with little regard for the ethical implications and potential for exploitation. This is largely due to the commodification of children and the dehumanization of women, particularly those from lower socioeconomic backgrounds.

Surrogacy involves the use of a woman’s body to produce a child for someone else, often for a significant sum of money. This commodification of children and women’s bodies is a form of human trafficking, as it involves the exploitation of vulnerable individuals for financial gain.

The surrogate mother, often from a lower socioeconomic background, is essentially renting out her body to produce a child for someone else. This is a clear example of exploitation, as she is being used for her reproductive capabilities and then discarded once her purpose has been served.

Moreover, the practice of surrogacy for gay couples is often justified under the guise of “progress” and “equality.” However, this ignores the fact that it is a form of human trafficking that dehumanizes women and commodifies children.

In a capitalist society, where money is the ultimate goal, the practice of surrogacy for gay couples is seen as just another way to make a profit. The rights and well-being of the surrogate mother and the child are often disregarded, as the focus is on the financial transaction.

It is time to recognize the dark side of surrogacy and acknowledge that it is a modern form of human trafficking. We must prioritize the rights and well-being of all individuals involved, rather than viewing them as commodities to be bought and sold.

Continue Reading

Politics

Nick Fuentes’ America First Populism Will Win

Published

on

In an era where the political landscape is dominated by establishment figures and grifters, Nick Fuentes emerges as a refreshing and unapologetic voice for America First populism. While many on the right pay lip service to putting America’s interests first, Fuentes is one of the few who consistently advocates for policies that prioritize the needs of the American people over the interests of foreign nations, particularly Israel.

Fuentes has been a vocal critic of the pro-Israel lobby’s influence on the Republican Party, arguing that it has led to a foreign policy that is often at odds with the interests of the American people. He has called out politicians who claim to be America First but support policies that benefit Israel at the expense of the United States, such as the massive aid package that the U.S. provides to Israel each year.

While some may dismiss Fuentes as a fringe figure, his message resonates with a growing number of Americans who are tired of the establishment’s empty promises and are looking for a leader who will truly put America’s interests first. Fuentes’ America First movement represents a rejection of the globalist agenda that has dominated both parties for decades and a return to a foreign policy that puts the needs of the American people above all else.

Fuentes’ uncompromising stance on Israel has earned him the ire of the pro-Israel establishment, but it has also won him the respect of many on the right who are tired of seeing their leaders kowtow to the demands of a foreign nation. As the America First movement continues to gain momentum, Fuentes’ message is likely to become increasingly mainstream, forcing the Republican Party to confront the issue of Israel’s influence on its foreign policy.

In the end, it is clear that Nick Fuentes represents the future of the America First movement, and his brand of populism is likely to win out over the grifters and establishment figures who surround Trump. While Trump may know where the real energy is, it is Fuentes who is leading the charge for a foreign policy that truly puts America’s interests first.

Trump would be wise to embrace Fuentes’ brand of America First populism, as it would likely result in even better results and increased popularity for his administration.

Continue Reading

Immigration

Preserving America’s Social Fabric: Zero Immigration and European Resurgence

Published

on

In the heart of the American Dream lies a nation built by immigrants, a melting pot of cultures and traditions. But as we stand at the crossroads of history, it is time to reevaluate our immigration policies and embrace a new vision for the future of our great nation.

For too long, we have allowed our borders to be overrun by those who do not share our values, who do not understand the importance of the American way of life. Our social fabric is being torn apart by the influx of people from cultures that are fundamentally at odds with our own.

It is time for a change. It is time for a new approach to immigration, one that puts the interests of the American people first. And there is no better leader to guide us through this transformation than President Donald J. Trump.

President Trump has always been a champion of the American people, a defender of our way of life. He understands that the key to preserving our social fabric is to promote a resurgence of the European population within our borders.

By implementing policies that encourage the growth of the European population, we can ensure that our nation remains true to its roots, true to the values that have made it the greatest country in the world.

There are many ways to achieve this goal. We can provide incentives for European immigrants to come to America, offering them a path to citizenship and a chance to contribute to our society. We can also invest in programs that promote the growth of the European population within our borders, providing support for families and encouraging them to have more children.

But perhaps the most important step we can take is to put an end to the current immigration system, which allows anyone and everyone to enter our country without regard for the impact on our society. We must embrace a zero-immigration policy, one that prioritizes the needs of the American people over the desires of those who seek to take advantage of our generosity.

By taking these steps, we can ensure that America remains a beacon of hope and freedom for generations to come. We can preserve the social fabric of our nation, the very essence of what makes us great. And we can do it with the leadership of President Donald J. Trump, a man who understands the importance of putting America first.

So let us stand together, united in our resolve to protect our way of life. Let us embrace a new vision for the future of our great nation, one that puts the interests of the American people above all else. For in the end, it is only through unity and determination that we can truly make America great again.

Continue Reading

Trending

Donate to Populist Wire

*Note: Every donation is greatly appreciated, regardless of the amount.